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Saturday, 28 November 2020

Pte Arthur Hannon 3058880 6th Canadian Reserve Battalion


 Pte. Arthur Hannon

6th Canadian Reserve Battalion     

Regimental Number 3058880

Arthur James Hannon was born on January, 18th, 1897, in Norwood, Ontario Township, Ontario to parents Robert and Hannah (Jones) Hannon.  The family farmed on Lot 4, Concession 6 in Dummer Township.

 Art was living in Norwood and working as a farmer when he was ordered called to report to the city of Peterborough on October 20th 1917, under the Military Service Act to undergo a medical examination to assess fitness for military service.  Art was nearly 20 years of age and single.  A small man, he stood just over 5 foot 4 inches tall and weighed 115 pounds.  He sported a ruddy complexion, blue eyes and brown hair.   He was a Methodist and had no previous military service.

 Hannon passed his physical and was declared fit for service.  He went home to the farm and awaited the inevitable call that would later come on May 9th 1918, to report for to Barrifield camp, Kingston, for military training.  Hannon arrived at the camp, but was immediately granted leave for the remainder of May, most likely to return home to plant the spring crop. 

 On June 1st he returned to Barriefield, this time for 3 days, before again being sent home for two days, from the 4th-6th.  After this two delay leave, he returned to Barriefield for the remainder of June and July. During this time, Art entered Ongwanada Hospital in Kington suffering from shoulder pain.  After 6 days there he was transferred to Queen’s Hospital on July 11th.  He told doctors that he had been kicked by a horse three years earlier, and had never had full use of his left arm ever since.  Hannon remained at the hospital for four days and after X-rays, Doctors did not find much wrong with his arm.  Even so, they suggested that an operation may see improvements.   Hannon declined and was discharged 9 days later, being described as in “perfect condition” and with the recommendation that he be allowed to return home and help with the haying.

It is unclear whether he returned home or stayed with his unit at Barriefield at this point, but the records do show that he travelled east to Halifax in early August.  He boarded the transport ship Kia Oro on August 10th and began his voyage across the Atlantic.

 He arrived safely in England on the 25th of August 1918 and marched to the Canadian training camp at Seaford.  There he joined the ranks of the 6th Reserve Battalion, and awaited orders to transfer to a fighting unit already at the front.  Art would never make it to the battlefields, he remained in England until the end of the war, and soon after fell seriously ill.  He was admitted to the No.12 General Hospital in Bramshott on November 27th for the mumps for just over two weeks.  He was only 2 months recovered when he was struck down with the Spanish Flu on the 4th of February 1919, He spent a little over a month in hospital before being discharged. After only two months of better health, Art again entered an English hospital suffering from debility, this time spending two months in care before being discharged.

 Arthur sailed for Canada on June 23rd 1919 and was later discharged on July 3rd.  He returned to farm in Dummer.  

 Art Hannon Passed away in Peterborough, Ontario on April 27th 1966.  He is buried in Norwood, Ontario.

 

Sources

Canada. "Military Service File of Arthur James Hannon McMurray." Library and Archives Canada, Ottawa: Record Group 150, Accession 1992-93/166, Box 4024 - 1. Item Number 444549.

Library and Archives Canada. Census of Canada, 1901. Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Year: 1901; Census Place: Dummer, Peterborough (East/est), Ontario; Page: 6; Family No: 60.

Library and Archives Canada. Census of Canada, 1911. Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Year: 1911; Year: 1911; Census Place: 21 - Dummer, Peterborough East, Ontario; Page: 5; Family No: 42.

Sunday, 8 November 2020

Pte. Russell Puffer

 



Pte. Russell Puffer

1st Depot Battalion, Eastern Ontario Regiment 

Regimental Number 3059001

Russell Elmer Puffer was born on April 11th, 1896 in Norwood, Ontario He was the son of William and Agnes (Cuthbertson) Puffer.   

Russell was living in Clarina, an area in the northern part of Dummer Township when he was ordered to report to Peterborough under the Military Service Act on October 23rd, 1917.  He travelled to Peterborough where he underwent a military examination and was declared fit for overseas military service.  He was 22 years old, single and employed as a farmer.  He was 5 foot 7 inches tall, and sported a dark complexion, grey eyes and dark brown hair.  He was a Methodist and had no previous military experience.

 The next step in Russell’s military journey came on May 10th when he was ordered to report to the Canadian Forces training camp at Barriefield, Kingston.   He was attested as a Private into the 1st Depot Battalion, Eastern Ontario Regiment and trained with them before sailing for England on the ship City of Vienna on June 28th 1918.  This trip was short lived as the ship ran aground before it left the Canadian coast.  The entire ship was evacuated using yachts which pulled up alongside and let the soldiers and crew crawl down rope ladders.  About thirty minutes after the last men were taken off the ship, it sank to the bottom of the Atlantic.

 Russell and his comrades would make their second attempt at crossing the Atlantic on July 11th 1918 aboard the H.M.T. Thongwa.  After an eleven day trip across the Atlantic, Pte. Puffer arrived safely in London.  He was immediately placed in the 6th Canadian Reserve Battalion at Seaford Camp to await assignment to a fighting battalion at the front. 

 He entered the No. 14 Canadian General Hospital in Eastbourne dangerously ill with the mumps on the 10th of August 1918.  He was discharged after two months in care on October 10th 1918 and was reposted to the 6th Reserve Battalion.  His good health was not for long as he re-entered the hospital at Eastbourne dangerously ill with Lombar Pneumonia on October 22nd, he recovered and was discharged on November 14th, two days after the war had ended.

 Puffer remained in England awaiting his trip home, but entered the No. 12 General Hospital on June 12, 1919 with Gastritis.  He remained there for nearly three weeks before being transferred to Orpington where his diagnosis changed to hypochlorhydria, a condition characterized by digestive complications and gastrointestinal infections. After another month of treatment, he felt well enough to be discharged from care. He sailed to Canada a few days later on July 12th 1919.  He was given a formal discharge for military service in Toronto on July 23rd, 1919.

Russell moved back to Dummer to farm and married Mabel Ivey on the 6th of November 1920.  He passed away March 25th 1976 and is buried in Norwood, Ontario.


Sources
Archives of Ontario. Registrations of Births and Stillbirths – 1869-1913. Toronto, Ontario, Canada: Series: MS929; Reel: 134. P.58.
Library and Archives Canada. Census of Canada, 1901. Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Year: 1901; Census Place: Dummer, Peterborough (East/est), Ontario; Page: 2; Family No: 12
Archives of Ontario; Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Registrations of Marriages, 1869-1928; Reel: 547. P.471.
Canada. "Military Service File of Russell Puffer." Library and Archives Canada, Ottawa: Record Group 150, Accession 1992-93/166, Box 8015-53. Item Number 507088.

Wednesday, 12 August 2020

Pte. Henry Payne 46612


Pte. Henry W.N. Payne
46th Canadian Infantry Battalion
Regimental Number 426612

Henry “Harry” Wilbert Norman Payne was born in Dummer Township on July 14th 1884 to parents Frederick Payne and Rebecca White.  His parents farmed on Lot 22, Concession 5 of the township.

On August 27, 1909 Henry married Alice Dunford of Douro in Lakefield, Ontario.  The young couple moved to farm in Dummer, where Harry continued to farm.  Sadly, Alice died on April 25th 1912, shortly after the birth of their first child. Sometime after this Harry headed to Western Canada.

He was living in Saskatchewan and working as a farmer when he enlisted with the 46th Overseas Battalion in Moosejaw on March 22nd 1915.  He was nearly 31 years old and declared himself a widower with one child.  He stood 5 foot 7 inches tall, weighed 130 pounds, and had a dark complexion, dark blue eyes and black hair. He indicated that he had one year previous service with the Canadian Dragoons.

Pte. Payne and the 46th Battalion sailed aboard the S.S. Lapland from Halifax on October 23rd 1915 and arrived safely in Devonport, England nine days later.   Though the 46th Battalion would be sent to France as a complete battalion in the upcoming months, Henry Payne left their ranks and joined the 16th Canadian Battalion in the trenches on June 20th.   He served at the front for close to two months before entering the Casualty Clearing Station on August 17th with an undetermined illness. He complained of shortness of breath after slight exertion such as walking rapidly.  Payne also complained of attacks of rheumatism which he had incurred for ten to twelve years previously.  He explained that this ailment had been aggravated when he was shaken up by a shell landing near him while doing sentry duty days earlier in a trench at Hill 60. When the Battalion started their march to the Somme six days later, he was obliged to fall out after experiencing shortness of breath, dizziness, neck pain, as well as poor circulation in his legs.

Payne remained at the No. 10 Stationary Hospital in St. Omer, France until being transferred to the County of London War Hospital in Epsom, England on September 3rd. There he was diagnosed with valvular disease of the heart and treated for Aortic Stenosis.  He improved under treatment and was then sent to the Canadian Divisional Convalescent Hospital at Epsom a month later, before being discharged on December 20th, being declared medically unfit for duty at the front.

Harry Payne returned to Canada aboard the S.S. Northland on January 13th 1917.   He remained in Kingston, residing at the Richardson Convalescent Home for close to eight months before being transferred to Queen’s Military Hospital.  He was treated here as an outpatient for a month before being diagnosed with a heart murmur and an enlarged aorta, and discharged at the end of November 1917. 

After nearly a year since his discharge, Pte. Harry Payne’s condition improved and he was reenlisted on October 17th 1918 for clerical work in the Quartermaster Stores in No. 3 Military District, Kingston.  He continued to serve in this capacity until after the war, being discharged in January of 1920 after rising to the rank of Sergeant.

After leaving the military, Harry worked as a stores clerk at the Canadian General Electric Company in Peterborough, Ontario in the post-war years.  He died on February 20, 1928 at the Nicholl’s Hospital in Peterborough, Ontario from myocarditis.  Even though much time had elapsed since Henry had served in the First World War, doctors recorded in his medical records that his death “was related to service duty”, and it is for this reason that his name is included on the Douro-Dummer cenotaph as a casualty of the First World War.  Henry Payne is buried in St. Mark’s Cemetery in Warsaw, Ontario.

Sources
Archives of Ontario. Registrations of Births and Stillbirths – 1869-1913. Toronto, Ontario, Canada: Series: MS929; Reel: 67; Record Group: RG 80-2. Page 51.
Library and Archives Canada. Census of Canada, 1891. Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Census Place: Dummer, Peterborough East, Ontario, Canada; Roll: T-6363; Family No: 38.
Library and Archives Canada. Census of Canada, 1901. Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Year: 1901; Census Place: Dummer, Peterborough (east/est), Ontario; Page: 9; Family No: 85.
Library and Archives Canada. Census of Canada, 1911. Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Year: 1911; Census Place: 22 - Dummer Township, Peterborough East, Ontario; Page: 3; Family No: 30. Page 3.
Canada. "Military Service File of Henry Norman Payne." Library and Archives Canada, Ottawa: Record Group 150, Accession 1992-93/166, Box 7670-30. Item Number 570664.
Library and Archives Canada. Sixth Census of Canada, 1921. Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Reference Number: RG 31; Folder Number: 82; Census Place: Peterboro (City), Peterborough West, Ontario; Page Number: 27
Archives of Ontario; Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Registrations of Marriages, 1869-1928; Reel: 926. P.32.
Archives of Ontario. Registrations of Deaths, 1869-1947 (MS 935, reels 1-694), Archives of Ontario, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Collection: MS935; Reel: 363.

Nursing Sister Sarah Miller

 

Nursing Sister Sarah Miller

Canadian Army Medical Corps 

Regimental Number: 

 Sarah Margaret Coleman was born on October 9th, 1867 in Warkworth, Ontario.  She was the daughter of Vincent, a school teacher, and Sarah Coleman.   She received her education at Port Hope and Ottawa.  She later taught school for 13 years around Campbellford, Welcome and Gananoque.

 In 1896 Sarah graduated from the New York Hospital and in 1903 came to Peterborough as the Matron of the Nicholls Hospital, a position that she held for three years.

 Several years later, Sarah at age 39, married David Miller, a farmer from Dummer, in Port Hope, Ontario on October 16th 1906.  They lived on a farm near Warsaw, Ontario for 10 years.

 Sarah and David were living in Warsaw when she enlisted as a nursing sister in the Canadian Expeditionary Force on July 22nd 1916.  As a nurse, she was given the officer’s rank of Lieutenant, which brought $2.00 a day pay and a 60 cent field allowance; twice the $1.10 wage of a private in the infantry.  She listed her religion as Presbyterian, and her occupation as nurse.  She has no previous military service.  She was 48 years old, stood five feet five inches and weighed 180 pounds. 

 Sarah left for England aboard the ship Ascania on August 16, 1916 and arrived there safely twelve days later.  She was taken directly into the Canadian Army Medical Corp and posted to Moore Barracks Hospital in Shorncliffe 5 days later.

 By September 22nd Sarah was put in charge of a Canadian Convalescent hospital in Wear Bay, near Dover.  She was later transferred back to Moore Barracks Hospital on December 24th 1916, before being posted to No. 11 General Hospital at Moore Barracks October 1, 1917. 

David & Sarah Miller Post War
David & Sarah Miller Post War

Sarah finished her wartime experience overseas when she was posted to the British hospital ship Araguaya on Feb 2nd 1918, to care for the wounded soldiers as they made their way across the Atlantic.  Sarah arrived in Canada on February 16th 1918, and resigned her commission twelve days later.

 Sarah returned to the farm on the 1st concession, lot 14 in Dummer, where she continued life with her husband David until 1939.  During that time she was the correspondent for the Peterborough Examiner in Warsaw, as well as an active member of the Women’s Institute, the Legion, the Woman’s Missionary Society and the United Church.   In 1939 Sarah and David moved in to the village of Warsaw where she lived for five years before moving to Lakefield in 1944. Sarah passed away there on September 6th, 1952, at the age of 84 years.

 Sources

Archives of Ontario; Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Registrations of Marriages, 1869-1928; Reel: 123. P.74.Canada. "Military Service File of Sarah Margaret Coleman Miller." Library and Archives Canada, Ottawa: Record Group 150, Accession 1992-93/166, Box 6196-47. Item Number 185831.Warsaw Women’s Institute 60th Anniversary Binder: “Sarah Miller, Life Member”. Tweedsmuir Community History Collections: Stoney Creek, On, 1963-1977. Library and Archives Canada. Sixth Census of Canada, 1921. Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Library and Archives Canada, 2013. Series RG31. Statistics Canada Fonds.  RG 31; Folder Number: 81; Census Place: 81, Peterborough East, Ontario; Page Number: 9. P 10.Library and Archives Canada. Census of Canada, 1891. Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Library and Archives Canada, 2009. Census Place: Seymour, Northumberland East, Ontario, Canada; Roll: T-6357; Family No: 112. P.63.Canada. "Census of Canada, 1881." Statistics Canada Fonds, Census Place: Hope, Durham East, Ontario; Roll: C_13241; Page: 1; Family No: 3. P.1.Library and Archives Canada. Census of Canada, 1871. Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Year: 1871; Census Place: Hope, Durham East, Ontario; Roll: C-9979; Page: 2.

Saturday, 25 January 2020

Pte. John Payne 3057838


Pte. John R. Payne
1st Depot Battalion, Eastern Ontario Regiment
Regimental Number 3057838

John Russell Payne was born on March 10th, 1890 in Warsaw, Ontario. He was the son of Paul and Mary Ann (Russell) Payne.   The family farmed on Lot 14 on the 4th Concession of Dummer for a number of years before appearing to live in Douro Township by 1911.

Paul was living in Lakefield and employed as a farmer when he received the call to report to Peterborough, Ontario under the Military Service Acton on October 26th, 1917. 

Paul travelled to Peterborough where he underwent a medical examination and was declared fit for overseas service.  He was nearly 28 years old and stood 5 feet, 8 inches.  He was described as having a dark complexion, brown eyes and dark brown hair.  He was single and declared that he had no previous military experience.  John was not immediately called into service but waited for further notice

He was ordered to report to the Canadian Forces training base at Barriefield Camp, Kingston on April 19th 1918.  He was placed in the 1st Depot Battalion, Eastern Ontario Regiment to begin training until he was sent overseas at a later date.  John remained at Barriefield until June.  It was noted in his service file that got into a little trouble there as he is noted as forfeiting 12 days’ pay for being “Absent without Leave”.  He was stuck off strength at Barriefield and allowed to return home on September 9th 1918, most likely to help with the harvest on the farm.

Sources
Archives of Ontario. Registrations of Births and Stillbirths – 1869-1913. Toronto, Ontario, Canada: Series: MS929; Reel: 101; Record Group: RG 80-2. Page 6.
Library and Archives Canada. Census of Canada, 1891. Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Dummer, Peterborough East, Ontario, Canada; Roll: T-6363; Family No: 77. Page 9.
Library and Archives Canada. Census of Canada, 1901. Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Year: 1901; Census Place:  Dummer, Peterborough (East/est), Ontario; Page: 13; Family No: 126
Library and Archives Canada. Census of Canada, 1911. Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Library and Archives Canada: Year: 1911; Census Place: 17 - Douro, Peterborough East, Ontario; Page: 5; Family No: 47
Library and Archives Canada. Sixth Census of Canada, 1921. Ottawa, Ontario, Canada:  RG 31; Folder Number: 82; Census Place: Peterboro (City), Peterborough West, Ontario; Page: 23
Archives of Ontario; Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Registrations of Marriages, 1869-1928; Reel: 585.
Canada. "Military Service File of John Russell Payne Tighe." Library and Archives Canada, Ottawa: Record Group 150, Accession 1992-93/166, Box 7671-30. Item Number 570719.

Lieut. Henry Parker 297027


Lieut. Henry Parker
Canadian Forestry Corps.
Regimental Number 297027

Henry Albert Parker was born on April 15th, 1886 in South Dummer Township, Ontario. He was the son of Thomas J. and Jane (Spouse) Parker.  The family farmed in Dummer for a number of years before moving to Havelock sometime after

Henry was living in Havelock, Ontario and working as a forestry engineer when he enlisted in Ottawa as a private with the 224th Canadian Forestry Battalion on March 7th, 1916.  He was 29 years old, unmarried and listed his religion as Methodist.  Henry stood 5 feet, 10 inches tall and sported a fair complexion, grey eyes and black hair.  He indicated that he had previous military service as a Sergeant with the C.C.Y.C., (Cadets) at Toronto University.

Parker trained in Canada with the Forestry Battalion for the next two months months, quickly rising in rank to Corporal on April 1st and then to Acting Sergeant on the 18th.  He proceeded with his battalion overseas on April 25th aboard the H.M.S. Empress of Britain.  He arrived safely in England on the 5th of May and was stationed in London with the 224th Battalion, where he was immediately promoted to Sergeant.   Parker was admitted to hospital the next day, suffering from hemoptysis (the coughing up of blood) and would spend nearly his entire first month overseas in a London hospital before being discharged on the 24th of May.  After regaining his health, Sergt. Parker was engaged in the organization of timber operations within the Canadian Forestry Corps in London.

Sergeant Parker continued his rise in rank when he was posted as a temporary Lieutenant on July 12th 1917.  This change would bring significant prestige of being a commissioned officer.  Two months later, on the first of September Lieutenant Parker was reassigned as the Director of Timber Operations for the 117th company of the Canadian Forestry Corps in Southampton, England.

After two months in the south of England, Parker was transferred to the Canadian Forestry Base in Inverness, Scotland on November 21, 1917. He remained posted there for the remainder of the war, and even granted a six month leave with pay to attend the University of Edinburgh for studies from January 18th to May 5th 1919.
Henry Parker passed away on 1968 and is buried
in Queen's Park Cemetery, Calgary, Alberta.

Lieutenant Henry Parker embarked Glasgow on June 18th 1919 aboard the H.M.T. Saturnia.  He arrived in Canada ten days later and was formally discharged in Medicine Hat, Alberta on July 3rd 1919.  Parker remained in that province and continued to work in forestry for many years after the war.  He passed away in 1968 and is buried in Queen’s Park Cemetery in Calgary, Alberta.

Sources
Archives of Ontario. Registrations of Births and Stillbirths – 1869-1913. Toronto, Ontario, Canada: Series: MS929; Reel: 78; Record Group: RG 80-2.
Library and Archives Canada. Census of Canada, 1891. Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Census Place: Dummer, Peterborough East, Ontario, Canada; Roll: T-6363; Family No: 180. Page 19.
Library and Archives Canada. Census of Canada, 1901. Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Year: 1901; Census Place: Dummer, Peterborough (East/est), Ontario; Page: 4; Family No: 37
Library and Archives Canada. Sixth Census of Canada, 1921. Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Reference Number: RG 31; Folder Number: 155; Census Place: Maple Creek, Saskatchewan; Page Number: 1
Canada. "Military Service File of \henry Albert Parker." Library and Archives Canada, Ottawa: Record Group 150, Accession 1992-93/166, Box 7588-41. Item Number 567198.

Friday, 24 January 2020

Pte. Kenneth C. Murphy 3058937


Pte. Kenneth C. Murphy
1st Depot Battalion, Eastern Ontario Regiment
Regimental Number 3058937

Kenneth Court Murphy was born on June 16th, 1897 in Dummer Township, Ontario. He was the son of John and Emma (Newnham) Murphy.   The family was recorded as living and farming in Dummer until at least 1901, but sometime before 1911 they moved to Lakefield.

Kenneth was living and working on the family farm in Lakefield when he was called to report to Peterborough under the Military Service Act on October 23rd, 1917.  He was given a medical examination there, and was deemed fit for overseas service.  He was described as nearly 21 years of age, standing 5 feet, 5 inches tall and sporting a dark complexion, blue eyes and dark brown hair.  He was a farmer by trade and a Methodist.  He had no previous military experience.

Kenneth reported to the Canadian forces training camp at Barriefield, Ontario on May 10th, 1918, but was given leave to return home the next day.  His service file indicates that he returned to Barriefield in June and remained there the entire month. He was struck off strength from service on September 9, 1918, “due to placement in a low category”.

Sources
Archives of Ontario. Registrations of Births and Stillbirths – 1869-1913. Toronto, Ontario, Canada: Series: MS929; Reel: 143; Record Group: RG 80-2. Page 130. 
Library and Archives Canada. Census of Canada, 1901. Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Year: 1901; Census Place: Dummer, Peterborough (East/est), Ontario; Page: 13; Family No: 135. P.38.
Library and Archives Canada. Census of Canada, 1911. Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Library and Archives Canada: Census Place: 14 - Smith, Peterborough West, Ontario; Page: 4; Family No: 40
Library and Archives Canada. Sixth Census of Canada, 1921. Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: RG 31; Folder Number: 81; Census Place: Otonabee (Township), Peterborough East, Ontario; Page Number: 14
Canada. "Military Service File of Kenneth Court Murphy." Library and Archives Canada, Ottawa: Record Group 150, Accession 1992-93/166, Box 6514-47. Item Number 208685.
Archives of Ontario; Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Registrations of Marriages, 1869-1928; Reel: 658. Page 358. 

Pte. Lorne T. Newnham 3060076


Pte. Lorne T. Newnham
1st Depot Battalion, Eastern Ontario Regiment
Regimental Number 3060076

Lorne Theodore Newnham was born on March 26th, 1895 in Warsaw, Ontario. He was the son of John Newnham and Margaret Jane Dodds.  The family lived on Lot 12 on the 6th Concession.   

Lorne was living in Selwyn Township and working as a farmer when he was called to report to Barriefield, Ontario under the Military Service Act on May 17th, 1918. 

Lorne reported to the Canadian Forces training camp at Barriefield and underwent a medical examination which found him fit to serve overseas.  He was 23 years of age and indicated that he had 6 weeks of previous military service with the 3rd Prince of Wales Dragoons.  Lorne was described as standing 5 feet, 7 inches tall and weighing 130 pounds.  He sported a dark complexion, brown eyes and black hair.  He listed his religion as Methodist and his wife Donalda Newnham of Selwyn as his next of kin.

Lorne remained at Barriefield camp, serving with the 1st Depot Battalion until he was discharged after the war’s end on January 25th, 1919. 

Sources
Archives of Ontario. Registrations of Births and Stillbirths – 1869-1913. Toronto, Ontario, Canada: Series: MS929; Reel: 128; Record Group: RG 80-2. Page 49.
Library and Archives Canada. Census of Canada, 1901. Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Year: 1901; Census Place: Dummer, Peterborough (East/est), Ontario; Page: 15; Family No: 147. Page 40.
Library and Archives Canada. Census of Canada, 1911. Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Library and Archives Canada: Year: 1911; Year: 1911; Census Place: 16 - Selwyn, Peterborough West, Ontario; Page: 1; Family No: 6. Page 1.
Canada. "Military Service File of Lorne T. Newnham." Library and Archives Canada, Ottawa: Record Group 150, Accession 1992-93/166, Box 7296-48. Item Number 560095.
Archives of Ontario; Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Registrations of Marriages, 1869-1928; Reel: 430

Pte. David Nelson 3060723



Pte. David Nelson
1st Depot Battalion, Eastern Ontario Regiment
Regimental Number 3060723

David Andrew Nelson was born on December 28th 1896 in Warsaw, Ontario. He was the son of Andrew Simeon Nelson and Jane Agnes Fife who lived on Lot 7 of the 2nd Concession.   

David was living in Dummer and working as a farmer when he was called up for service under the Military Service Act on August 1st, 1918.   David reported to the Canadian forces training camp at Barriefield, Ontario where he underwent a medical examination that found him fit for overseas service.  He was 21 years old, stood just over six feet tall and weighed 165 pounds.  He was characterized with a fair complexion, hazel coloured eyes and light brown hair.  He was recorded as being Presbyterian and as having no previous military experience. 
David Nelson passed away in 1985
and is buried in St. Mark's Cemetery in
Warsaw Ontario

David trained with the 1st Depot Battalion, Eastern Ontario Regiment at Barriefield Camp even until after the war’s end.  He was struck off strength of the military on January 24th 1919.    

Sources
Archives of Ontario. Registrations of Births and Stillbirths – 1869-1913. Toronto, Ontario, Canada: Series: MS929; Reel: 139; Record Group: RG 80-2. Page 107.
Library and Archives Canada. Census of Canada, 1901. Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Year: 1901; Census Place: Dummer, Peterborough (East/est), Ontario; Page: 6; Family No: 59. Page 31.
Library and Archives Canada. Census of Canada, 1911. Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Library and Archives Canada: Year: 1911; Census Place: 19 - Dummer Township, Warsaw Village, Peterborough East, Ontario; Page: 11; Family No: 129
Archives of Ontario; Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Registrations of Marriages, 1869-1928; Reel: 658. Page 398.
Library and Archives Canada. Sixth Census of Canada, 1921. Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Reference Number: RG 31; Folder Number: 81; Census Place: Dummer (Township), Peterborough East, Ontario; Page Number: 9.
Canada. "Military Service File of David Andrew Nelson." Library and Archives Canada, Ottawa: Record Group 150, Accession 1992-93/166, Box 7264-23. Item Number 558246.

Wednesday, 15 January 2020

Spr. Melville Parsons 195492

Spr. Melville Parsons

93rd Battalion/ 4th Pioneer Battalion
Regimental Number 195492

Melville Joseph Parsons, along with a twin sister, was born on August 29th, 1895 in Dummer Township, Ontario. He was the son of George and Eliza (Reynolds) Parsons.   The Parsons are shown to have lived in Dummer until at least 1911.

Melville was living near Lakefield and employed in farming when he enlisted with the 93rd Battalion on January 12th, 1916.  He was 20 years old, stood 5 feet, 5 inches tall and weighed 127 pounds.  Melville was described as having a dark complexion, hazel eyes and dark brown hair.  He was a member of the Church of England and was unmarried with no previous military experience.  Doctors noted that he had a small scar between his eyes.

Melville was considered medically fit for service and joined the Peterborough 93rd Battalion which was training in the city that winter while it recruited up to strength.  When the unit neared complete strength, it left the city by train for the Canadian forces training camp at Barriefield, Ontario at the end of May 1916.  Melville and his battalion had only been at the camp five days when a call came out for volunteers to transfer to the Pioneer Battalion, which brought with it the promise of a more recent trip overseas than with the 93rd.  Melville was one of fifty men who volunteered and was then one of twenty-one out of those, who was selected to transfer.

Pte. Parsons continued to train as a pioneers in Canada for the next three months.  Pioneers worked in conjunction with the Canadian Engineers in forward areas in varied work that included consolidating positions captured by the infantry, tunnelling, mining, wiring, railroad work, deep dugout work and laying out, building and keeping trenches in repair.  During this time garnered a blemish on his good record when he forfeited six days’ pay for being declared “absent without leave “on the 22nd of July.  He and his unit left Canada for overseas on September 12th 1916 and arrived in Liverpool, England after a ten day crossing.

He was transferred to the Canadian Railway Transport Depot CRTD in Crowborough on December 2nd.  It was nearly two weeks before he was assigned to the 2nd Battalion Canadian Railway Troops on the 18th of December, and another month before he proceeded to France for service.  He landed in France with the Railway Troops on January 13th, 1917.  Sapper (a rank equivalent to a Pte. In the infantry) Parsons served in France for the duration of the war, except for a two week leave to the U.K. granted from February 13-March 3rd of 1918.   His service file indicates that he was employed in the trade of farrier, someone who trims and shoes horse’s feet.  After the war’s end he was transferred to England on January 19th 1919 to await demobilization first at the Canadian Railway Troops Depot at Witley Camp, then to Kimmel Park in North Wales on May 21st, 1919.  It is interesting to note that it was at Kimmel Park on February 14th that Melville Parsons was given approval to marry.

Melville Parsons returned to Canada and was formally discharged from military service on September 10, 1919.  He later traveled west to Napinka, Manitoba where he raised a family.  Melville passed away on December 30, 1969.


Sources
Archives of Ontario. Registrations of Births and Stillbirths – 1869-1913. Toronto, Ontario, Canada: Series: MS929; Reel: 128; Record Group: RG 80-2.
Library and Archives Canada. Census of Canada, 1901. Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Year: 1901; Census Place: Dummer, Peterborough (East/est), Ontario; Page: 6; Family No: 51.
Library and Archives Canada. Census of Canada, 1911. Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Library and Archives Canada: Year: 1911; Census Place: 19 - Dummer, Peterborough East, Ontario; Page: 2; Family No: 15.
Canada. "Military Service File of Melville Joseph Parsons." Library and Archives Canada, Ottawa: Record Group 150, Accession 1992-93/166, Box 7616 - 16. Item Number 571204.

Pte. Everett Moore 3058933


Pte. Everett Moore 

1st Depot Battalion Eastern Ontario Regiment
Regimental Number 3058933

Everett Robert Moore was born to in Warsaw Ontario on September 2nd, 1897 Robert and Hattie (Hamblin) Moore who farmed on the fourth concession of Dummer Township. 

Everett was a 20 year old working on the family farm when he was required to formally register under the Military Service Act of 1917.  The registration was the first step in conscription and required that every man aged 20-45 report for a medical inspection so they could be placed in a category based on their ability to serve.  During this reporting process, a man could request an exemption, which meant that his case could be heard before an exemption tribunal, which could exempt, defer or delay his service if deemed appropriate.  Everett claimed exemption on grounds of health. 

His case was heard before the exemption tribunal, in a public trial, in Peterborough on April 25th 1918.  The Peterborough Examiner reported on the tribunal and recorded the following details of Everett’s case:

“Everett Moore, aged 20, took His Honour’s verdict of no chance of exemption philosophically and resumed his seat, audibly promising himself a ‘good time as long as he lasts’ ’’.

Everett was ordered to the Canadian training camp at Barriefield, near Kingston, Ontario on May 10th, where he underwent a further medical examination.  It was immediately discovered that he suffered from a valvular deficiency of the heart and for this reason was considered category C.1, which meant that he was unfit for overseas service.  He was 20 years old, stood 5 foot 4 inches tall and sported a dark complexion, brown hair and brown eyes.  He was described as a farmer, single and a Methodist.  He has no previous military experience.  Everett was sent home the next day, and put on leave.  He remained there until the end of the war. 

Everett died in 1948 at age 51 due to heart problems.

Sources
Library and Archives Canada. Census of Canada, 1901. Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Year: 1901; Census Place: Dummer, Peterborough (east/est), Ontario; Page: 2; Family No: 15.
Library and Archives Canada. Census of Canada, 1911. Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Library and Archives Canada: Year: 1911; Census Place: 19 - Dummer Township, Warsaw Village, Peterborough East, Ontario; Page: 2; Family No: 16
Library and Archives Canada. Sixth Census of Canada, 1921. Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Reference Number: RG 31; Folder Number: 81; Census Place: Dummer (Township), Peterborough East, Ontario; Page Number: 6.
Archives of Ontario. Registrations of Births and Stillbirths – 1869-1913. Toronto, Ontario, Canada: Series: MS929; Reel: 139; Record Group: RG 80-2. P.18
Canada. "Military Service File of Everett Robert Moore." Library and Archives Canada, Ottawa: Record Group 150, Accession 1992-93/166, Box 6323-25. Item Number 175150.
 “Claims For Exemption Heard This Morning Before Judge Huycke.”  Evening Examiner, Peterborough. April 25, 1918. P.9